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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Robert Litt
General Cousel, Office of Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN2 07/19/2013
Litt continued: to specific, material that could bear on the issue. when it passed the business records provision Congress made clear that it had in mind broad concepts of relevance such as these and the telephony metadata collection program meets this broad relevance standard because as I explained earlier the effectiveness of the query is allowed by the court under strict limitations of this program. The queries that are based on reasonable and articulable suspicion. the effectiveness of these queries depends on collecting and maintaining the data from which against
Robert Litt
General Cousel, Office of Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN2 07/19/2013
Litt continued: which the narrowly focused query's can be made. As in the grand jury and civil discovery context, concept of relevance is broad enough to allow for the collection of information beyond that which ultimately turns out to be important to a terrorist related investigation. While the scope of the collection at issue here is broader than might typically be acquired through grand jury subpoena or civil discovery request, the basic principle is similar. the information is relevant because you need to have the broader set of records in order to identify within them the information that is actually important to a terrorism
Robert Litt
General Cousel, Office of Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN2 07/19/2013
Litt continued: which the narrowly focused query's can be made. As in the grand jury and civil discovery context, concept of relevance is broad enough to allow for the collection of information beyond that which ultimately turns out to be important to a terrorist related investigation. While the scope of the collection at issue here is broader than might typically be acquired through grand jury subpoena or civil discovery request, the basic principle is similar. The information is relevant because you need to have the broader set of records in order to identify within them the information that is actually important to a terrorism
Robert Litt
General Cousel, Office of Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN2 07/19/2013
Litt continued: approved by numerous judges in the FISA court, each of whom is determined that the application complies with all of legal requirements. and congress reauthorized section 215 in 2009-2011 after the Intelligence and Judiciary Committees of both houses had been briefed on the program and after information describing the program had been made available to all members of Congress. in short, all three branches of government have determined that this collection is lawful and reasonable in large part because substantial protections would provide for the privacy of every person whose telephone number is collected.
Robert Litt
General Cousel, Office of Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN2 07/19/2013
Litt: I specifically want to make a few points about the Fourth Amendment. First, Under established supreme court rulings the person has no legally recognized expectation of privacy in information he or she voluntarily gives to a third Party. So Obtaining those records from that third party is not a search as to the person I’ll return to this point in a moment. Second, the fourth amendment generally does not apply to foreigners outside the United
Robert Litt
General Cousel, Office of Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN2 07/19/2013
Litt continued: United States. And Third, the Supreme Court has said the reasonableness under the fourth amendment of searches without a warrant depends on balancing, quote, the intrusion on the individual's fourth amendment interests against the search’s promotion of legitimate governmental interests.
Ron Wyden
U.S. Senator (D-Oregon), Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 07/23/2013
Wyden: It may also surprise you that when president Obama came to office the administration agreed with me that these rulings need to be made public. in the summer of 2009i received a written commitment from the justice department and the office of the director of national intelligence that a process would begin, would be created to start redacting and declassifying FISA court opinions so that the American people would have some idea of what their government believes the law is allowed to do.
Ron Wyden
U.S. Senator (D-Oregon), Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 07/23/2013
Wyden continued: In the last four years exactly zero opinion have been released.
Ron Wyden
U.S. Senator (D-Oregon), Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 07/23/2013
Wyden: Especially troubling is the fact that there is nothing, nothing in the Patriot Act that limits the sweeping bulk collection to phone records. The government can use the Patriot Act business records authority to collect, collate, and retain all sorts of sensitive information, including medical records, financial records, or credit-card
Ron Wyden
U.S. Senator (D-Oregon), Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 07/23/2013
Wyden continued: purchases. They can use this authority to develop, for example, a database of gun owners, or readers of books and magazines that are deemed subversive. This means government’s authority to collect information on law abiding Americans is essentially limitless at this time. If it is a record held by have business, a membership organization, a doctor, a school or any other third party it could be subject to the bulk collection authority under the Patriot Act.
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